Today, I Stopped the Bleeding: First-aid in the Locker Room

Styptic 2

I have become the purveyor of Styptic pencils in the locker room at my health center. This past year I dispensed personal ‘pencils’ to three different gentlemen who apparently have not mastered the art of shaving and sliced themselves on the lip, neck and earlobe.

As an experienced blade shaver, I understand a nick on the neck, but a laceration of the lip and excision of the ear, or portion thereof, befuddles me.  It’s awkward, if not impossible, to have a conversation with a man whose blood is squirting down his cheek, cascading off his chin and splattering onto the floor like ink leaking from a cheap fountain pen. If not for the grey hair and loose skin that is a curse of us ‘senior citizens’, the bleeding gave each man the look of a pugilist who stepped out of the ring with the great Carmen Basilio*.

However, quick action saved the day, when I offered my Styptic pencil and stopped the carnage.  For the uninitiated, the Styptic is a pencil thin chalk-like instrument packed with astringents that “contract tissue to seal blood vessels”(Wickepedia).  A short stinging dab on the cut and the bleeding stops quickly. Every blade user should have one in his kit, or medicine cabinet.

Understand, the Styptic pencil is not ‘loaned’ to the bleeder.  On the contrary, it’s a giveaway with the proper response, “no, keep it” when he offers to return it.  Then, buy a replacement to make sure you keep supplied, as I did.

Styptic pencils are not expensive and last a long time, unless, of course, one spends his workout session during the peak ‘senior hours’ when shaky hands and diminishing eyesight contribute to cuts and nicks that call for a Styptic pencil, as they’ve called for mine, 3 times.

My ‘heroics’ wasn’t life saving but it still was first-aid.  And, over time, my embellishment might just make it seem so.

Everyone who shaves with a blade must have a ‘cut story’. What’s yours?

*Carmen Basilio was a boxer who won both the welterweight and middleweight crown in the 1950s.  He was well known for being a tough fighter who would wear down his opponent as the fight progressed into late rounds.  Carmen certainly was accustomed to getting cut or bruised on his face and his ‘cut man’ would stop the bleeding between rounds. I wonder if he had a big Styptic pencil among the tools of his trade.

 

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Published by

srbottch

Retired in 2013 after 5 years as an elementary school teacher and 40 years as a sales representative. My essays/stories are a way to communicate through the telling of personal experiences. One reader said about my essays, "...these are like a cold sip during a marathon run, simple, real life events". Enjoy the run!

11 thoughts on “Today, I Stopped the Bleeding: First-aid in the Locker Room”

    1. I tried a martini, once, when I was a ‘just turned legal age big shot’. I made such a face people in the restaurant saw and was so embarrassed that I never tried it again. What a wimp, eh. It’s a wonder I even became a blade shaver. What martini would you recommend? I bet you could write a story about it… (Once again, Elen, I enjoy your humor. Tell the ‘Gman’ he landed a good one)

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, it was based on an incident at the Y last week. I thought the poor fellow was going to bleed out, at first. Ha! Actually, it’s ‘srbottch’. I was called ‘Bottch’ in HS and college. So was my son. So, as not to get us confused in any social media, I use ‘sr’ to denote ‘senior’. Creative, isn’t it. Please let me know if you get my answers via this format.

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  1. Sounds like crucial first aid to me. I’m not quite brave enough to get a classic blade shaving kit, but there’s a nice Turkish barber shop round the corner from me. I go there sometimes to treat myself, and they are pros with the blade. You better agree with everything the barber says though. Once saw him give an extremely close shave to a BBC reporter whose take on Turkish politics he didn’t like.

    Liked by 1 person

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